Monday, September 14, 2009

Mailbox Monday (AND, snippets from SHAPE on reading)

This meme is hosted by Marcia at The Printed Page. I went for some book shopping after I was done with my haircut on Sunday. The following books came into my house last week:


  1. An Equal Stillness by Francesca Kay
  2. The Little Giant of Aberdeen County by Tiffany Baker
  3. Barefoot by Elin Hilderbrand
  4. The Eye of Jade by Diane Wei Liang
  5. The Piano Teacher by Janice Y.K. Lee
Do click on the link to read more about the books and the reviews on Amazon.com.

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I also have something interesting to share with you in relation to reading, and these snippets are taken from the August issue of SHAPE Malaysia magazine:

>> A NOVEL WAY TO RELAX (Page 11)
When you feel overwhelmed or anxious, don’t lose your mind, lose yourself in a good book. Reading for as little as 10 minutes lowers your heart rate and reduces stress, according to British study. “Getting caught up in the story helps you escape from your worries for a bit,” says study author David Lewis, the director of research at the Mind Lab, University of Sussex. No time to curl up with a best seller? Play an audiobook during your evening commute.

>> FIGHT MEMORY LOSS THE FUN WAY (Page 13)
Want to keep your brain super sharper, for longer? Try knitting up a storm or losing yourself in your favorite author’s latest novel, suggest researchers. In a study presented at the American Academy of Neurology, researchers concluded that activities that exercise the brain, like reading and knitting may delay or even prevent memory loss. The study involved 197 people between the ages of 70 and 89 with mild cognitive impairment, or diagnosed memory loss, and 1124 people in the same age group with no memory problems. They were asked a series of questions about their daily activities within the past year and in middle-age, when they were 50 to 65 years old. The results: Simple activities like reading magazines, knitting, and participating in social activities in mid-life cut the risk of memory loss development in the 70s and 80s by more than one-third.